Posted January 28, 2014

Marshawn Lynch appears for short session at Media Day, avoids major fine

NFC West, Seattle Seahawks, Super Bowl XLVIII
Marshawn Lynch and Media Day... a match made somewhere other than heaven.

Marshawn Lynch and Media Day… a match made somewhere other than heaven. (Matt Slocum/AP)

NEWARK, N.J. — Those who have covered Marshawn Lynch since he was traded to the Seattle Seahawks have been frustrated at times with his unwillingness to deal with the media in a public, on-the-record way. Some players would prefer to avoid that particular Pandora’s Box, and Lynch is definitely one — the Pro Bowl running back doesn’t like talking about himself (the better he performs in a game, the sooner he’s out of the locker room afterward), and there may be an element of fear that the press will write their own stories about him no matter what he says.

Of course, it doesn’t help when Lynch doesn’t talk, and the media is left with nothing to do but that. The NFL stepped in earlier this month and fined Lynch $50,000 for refusing to speak with the media throughout the 2013 season. His first subsequent media session on Jan. 5 clocked in at about 90 seconds and featured a host of monosyllabic responses.

The NFL started to back off on the fine structure until Lynch threatened to go dark on Media Day, potentially opening himself to the reversal of the suspension of that fine, with an extra $50,000 thrown in for good measure. Lynch was not assigned a podium for Seattle’s Media Day at the Prudential Center, but he did speak … for a little over six minutes, before backing up and backing off. He later conversed with Deion Sanders of the NFL Network for a couple minutes, and that was that.

However, whatever Lynch did was enough to reportedly avoid any further fine from the NFL. When asked by Sanders whether he preferred to let his play do the talking, he responded simply and definitively.

“I’m all ’bout that action, boss,” Lynch told Sanders.

“He doesn’t feel comfortable in settings like this,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said Tuesday. “And he doesn’t like to do things he’s told to do. Fortunately that hasn’t been a factor for our football team. In this setting, he becomes something of a recluse and he doesn’t want to be part of it. We try to respect him as much as we can.”

42 comments
GtrsRGr8
GtrsRGr8

The NFL people have shown themselves to be a bunch of intolerant (intolerant of introverts) bullies in my opinion.

OliverHutton
OliverHutton

I loved the interview, though Deion seemed like he was getting in his personal bubble a bit.

ShermanShermanov
ShermanShermanov

He owes nothing to me or the media.. It's a no win situation for Mr Lynch. 


Maybe he's waiting for an original question, though?

x72
x72

Fine this idiot for all he's worth. Certainly needs to be taught a lesson.

Terry
Terry

One man gets fined for talking.


Another man gets fined for not talking.


Some folks just can't win.


picklejuice
picklejuice

The answer is really quite simple. Don't force him to go out in front of a big group of press alone. Put him out there with Wilson or Sherman or Tate and let them answer all the questions for him.

mcgriddle
mcgriddle

He only gets such treatment because he is GOOD. If he were a special teamer he would be cut for being insubordinate. This is just how it works in the NFL, and all pro sports.

MrArlington
MrArlington

Lynch reminds me of that retarded brother from Old School. That artist who sat in his room like a creep.

golfertrevor
golfertrevor

The story is the game, we don't need writers rewriting it with their bullshi. 

ac4me
ac4me

He just wants to play football, not be a celebrity. 

Don't we already have enough celebrities in football? 

Billll
Billll

Why should the players have to talk to the press? Only morons really care what they have to say anyway.

FOOLKILLER
FOOLKILLER

You really don't like to throw the word rtard around but for this guy the shoe fits.

jaredydog123
jaredydog123

Another example of the press ruining an athletic event.  The press seems to think that sports is all about their careers. Sick!

sbello
sbello

That's the best interview yet. Only prime time could get 2 minutes out of Lynch. A man of few words. I fear this guy just looking at him at the monitor on my screen.  He's a great football player. The Broncos should be more than concerned.  

Slumdog
Slumdog

Seems strange to me that someone can be fined for not speaking to the press.  Doesn't freedom of speech incorporate freedom of silence?

rentistoohigh
rentistoohigh

Doug Farrar should be fined for this poor excuse for journalism


Go interview Chris Christie ...it's his show after all

friendly--neighborhood--scrawler
friendly--neighborhood--scrawler

Boo Hoo, Poor media cellar dwellers, bottom feeders, parasites, boat barnacles... 

THEY ONLY survive off controversy, negativity and in fighting, this is how the news cycle goes when these guys have nothing to write about... when they actually have to do some thinking, use their intelligence to write a news article.. its goes no where... nothing to read... this is why i will always kick all lowlife writers in their baby nuts until they replace those losers with competent writers.

These guys have no soul, after tearing down a person in the media they actually go home and put their heads on their pillow and sleep like nothing happened, while that person is still living it.

ihawk
ihawk

ironic to hear all the reporters complain about his silence, yet his silence is the biggest story of the day.  or is the joke really on me...

mkmck69
mkmck69

Say the wrong thing, get fined. Say nothing, get fined. Just give them a script Roger.

Chris8
Chris8

I think this is great.  The media needs to butt out.  It's not like they don't have thousands of other players to ask the same tired questions to.  Not everyone is a social butterfly.  If somebody doesn't want to talk to reporters, they shouldn't have to, no matter how much the media stomps their feet and holds their breath.


And getting fined for it is just so stupid.

ki.nazir72
ki.nazir72

Damned if you do, damned if you don't!

Cool
Cool

Who gives a flip if he wants to act like a recluse.  He probably thinks/knows it draws more attention to him than he would otherwise get.  I don't care to hear from him after hearing the short soundbites he does put out.  He doesn't appear to have anything smart to add to a conversation.

Mike26
Mike26

@GtrsRGr8  Look up "contractual obligations" and then come back.  

Voiceover310
Voiceover310

@mcgriddle That isn't just how it works in the NFL, it's life in general. If you're important enough, you will be afforded certain concessions. If you're lousy AND have a bad attitude, you're worthless. DUH

Mike26
Mike26

@jaredydog123  You CLEARLY don't understand the media's role in the NFL of today.

KristianColasacco
KristianColasacco

@Slumdog Please go look up Freedom of Speech and tell me how the definition applies to this at all. 

NickBrown
NickBrown

Could you try and sound like more of a moron please? Shut the hell up.

Visionz311
Visionz311

@Cool You are looking way too much into his silence.  I doubt he is strategically doing it to draw more attention.  As far as I can tell, he hate attention, large groups of people, and public speaking. That's called anxiety.  That doesn't mean he is not smart.

GtrsRGr8
GtrsRGr8

@Mike26 @GtrsRGr8  Your point is well taken. However, with the NFL having a legal monopoly in this country, one of very few permitted (the United States Post Office (in handling First Class mail) one other example that quickly comes to mind), athletes who want to play professional football really don't have much choice but to sign whatever contract the NFL puts in front of them if they want to play professional football in the U.S. Is this not true?

Slumdog
Slumdog

@KristianColasacco @Slumdog  Freedom of silence is inherent in freedom of speech.  We are free in this country to express our views or keep silent on them.  This even applies in a more serious instance when a crime has been committed (5th Amendment).  If Lynch signed a contract stating that he would speak to the press after each Seahawks game, then he is in violation of a private contract - but not the law.  

Mike26
Mike26

@GtrsRGr8 @Mike26  It's no different than other high-level, high-paying jobs in other industries - legal, political, corporate - except the media access "required" by an NFL contract isn't more than 1-2 hours a week for most players unless they WANT to speak to media longer.   Again, he CHOSE this field and all that goes with it; I have zero sympathy for him or others that chafe under the spotlight.  Granted, most of these stories are just rehashes of previous storylines, but if I were making 6 figures playing a game I think I could find the time to "make it through" a few hours a year of media questions.