Posted November 04, 2013

Texans coach Gary Kubiak suffered a Transient Ischemic Attack (mini-stroke)

Houston Texans, Indianapolis Colts, Uncategorized
Gary Kubiak was attended to immediately after collapsing on the field Sunday evening. (David J. Phillip/AP)

Gary Kubiak was attended to immediately after collapsing on the field Sunday evening. (David J. Phillip/AP)

As he was walking off the field at the half of Houston’s game against the Indianapolis Colts at Reliant Stadium, Texans head coach Gary Kubiak collapsed and was taken to a Houston-area hospital. Kubiak was given a battery of tests, and according to multiple reports coming out on Monday evening, the coach suffered a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA), often referred to as a “mini-stroke.”

TIAs are caused by blood clots just as stokes are; the difference is that in these cases, the clots clear more quickly. According to the American Stroke Association, most TIAs last about one minute, and generally don’t last longer than five minutes. TIAs don’t generally cause permanent brain damage or loss of motor function, but they are serious warning signs and lead to a higher probability of strokes in the future. About a third of those who have TIAs suffer strokes within a year.

“TIA is a warning stroke and gives a patient time to act and keep a permanent stroke from occurring,” Dr. Emil Matarese of St. Mary’s Medical Center in Langhorne, Pa. told the ASA’s website. “By recognizing TIA symptoms and getting to the hospital, the patient can get help in identifying why the TIA occurred and get treatment — either through medication or surgery — that can prevent a stroke from occurring.”

Fortunately, Kubiak received immediate attention from the stadium’s medical staff and was transported to the hospital quickly. ESPN’s Adam Schefter reported on Monday morning that Kubiak had been given Tissue Plasminogen Activator, which breaks down blood clots in people who suffer strokes.

There is no clear timeline for Kubiak’s return, nor has the team announced any plans for an interim head coach. Defensive coordinator Wade Phillips, who has been the head coach for the Denver Broncos, Buffalo Bills and Dallas Cowboys in his career, took Kubiak’s place in the second half of the loss to the Colts. The Texans are scheduled to travel to face the Arizona Cardinals on Nov. 10.

“There was a lot of unknown,” Phillips said after the game. “Everything was unknown as to what was going on and what happened to Kub. [Texans offensive coordinator] Rick Dennison obviously called the plays from the press box.  We had to adjust as far as the head coach not being there.  But, it was a shock to everybody.”

“Our primary concern is of course with Gary’s health and well-being,” Executive VP of Football Operations and General Manager Rick Smith said in a statement on Monday. “There have been so many people throughout the city and across the country that have reached out to express their love and support and we are thankful for everyone’s thoughts and prayers.  Gary is alert, coherent and in good spirits.  He is continuing to be evaluated and monitored.”

The 52-year-old Kubiak has been the Texans’ head coach since the 2006 season. Before that, he was the Denver Broncos’ longtime offensive coordinator, and a backup quarterback for the Broncos from 1983 through ’91.

21 comments
Lloydjf
Lloydjf

I'm an ER physician and you DON"T Give TPA (tissue plasminogen activator) for a TIA. You only give it for a stroke! TIA's by definition go away on their own, strokes don't. TPA is a very serious drug to use that has dangerous side effects such as brain hemorrhage. You only give it if you have to. I'm not saying a TIA isn't serious, just that Mr. Kubiak had a stroke if they gave him TPA (or they screwed up!)

camoore
camoore

We are praying for Coach Kubiak.

The Moore Family (True Redskins Fan).


VLP
VLP

Hoping Coach has a speedy and complete recovery!!!!

(PS to the writer of this article----gotta little typo going here: "...TIAs are caused by blood clots just as STOKES [should be STROKES} are..."

Fenris
Fenris

Well, God bless 'im. Speed is critical in dealing with strokes or TIAs, so glad he was on the field and there was no chance of him saying, "just let me lie down for awhile & I'll be ok," as he might have if he was at home. Hope all goes well for him.

NoQNoSuperBowl
NoQNoSuperBowl

I've had a TIA and there is nothing "mini" about it. Wish the guy all the best.

JacobJones
JacobJones

I am a huge Texan's fan, and long time critic of this guy.. I'm gonna be completely blunt, here.. Gary Kubiak is not a very good coach, and his philosophy is out-dated, and way too conservative for the toughest sports league on the planet.. That being said, it is completely obvious he is a genuinely nice, and good man, with a nice family and many people who love him.. My advice to Gary is retire, now, and live a nice long life with your family beside you..

btcvsolo
btcvsolo

Pulling for ya, man...

My brother had a mini-stroke a few years back then suffered another major stroke a year ago. Speech has improved but still no motor function on his right side. A frightening & evil thing...


Go_paul
Go_paul

can't believe he got tPA

HunterBishop
HunterBishop

Holy Christ. Thoughts out to the Kubiak family. 

bellini1
bellini1

@Lloydjf  I agree wholeheartedly and an also am an ER physician for 25 years. A. You don't give TPA for a TIA. B. I have never seen a TIA patient with look like that. Ever. This is the kind of information backed by Genentech and NFL that misleads the public and should be stopped. Just like the San Diego Chargers last year recommending everyone get "cardiac ct scans to prevent heart attacks". Outrageous

MatthewEugeneHaag
MatthewEugeneHaag

@Lloydjf I was just a lowly EMT B but I agree.  TPA does have some bad side effects and using it as a preventive measure is counter indicated.  You may wish to use some blood thinners or other clot breakers that are less dangerous just because if you have a TIA a larger more dangerous full blown stroke could be just down the road but TPA is almost as dangerous to the recipient as it is to the feaking CLOT!

Rick56
Rick56

@JacobJones You took this opportunity to say he is not a very good coach when the man is down?????? For God sake...he is only 52 why should he retire???? Gary's situation has nothing to do with football...

rskins09
rskins09

@JacobJones   30 % of any NFL  team's offense is THEIR QB  ..To compete  your team must have at least  an average QB  or above (skill level) Schaub just don't get it..Saw him play  @ UVA  four , five times  and Fed EX field and on TV ..He's average at best on a good day ..He loses to many games he should have won and  has  the best WR to ever play the game -- Andre Johnson ..Texans should  have drafted a another QB  two years ago ..Good QB's  are hard to find and if your team has one your going to keep him ..Remember The Redskins picked up Rex Grossman  from the Bears --why the Bears stayed with him for so long is beyond me ...Grossman   was awful ..Every play with him was 50 / 50 ..So I don't blame Kubiak  for all of Houston's woes ...I know , I know  ..you can't fire the team , you fire the coach and GM ..  Wish Gary Kubiak the  best ..

George19
George19

@btcvsolo Agreed; my wife died of a massive stroke at age 38.  Hope your brother keeps improving.

JacobJones
JacobJones

@rskins09 I agree to an extent, but it was Kubes who didn't bring someone else in to compete for the job.. The Texans should have drafted a QB after the 2011 season, when Schaub went down with the lis-franc injury, and they certainly should have drafted a QB last year, after Schaub's late season swoon (or brought in a F/A)..

 Just like it was Kubes who depended on a rookie CB and a retread in 2010, and just like they tried to rely on 2 rookie wide outs, last year.. There's a pattern here..

I think Kubes is a good person, and I hope he recovers, but he is an albatross on the neck of this franchise.. And if this is the way it's gotta happen, I'm gonna embrace it.. Lord knows McNair doesn't have the sack to fire anyone..

JacobJones
JacobJones

Well, you're allowed to think that, certainly.. Whatever i think about the man's coaching skills, this condition sounds serious, and i think he should seriously consider retirement.. Besides, he's gonna get canned at the end of the year, anyways..

MatthewEugeneHaag
MatthewEugeneHaag

@JacobJones @meandmesa I mostly agreed with you til this point.  They are not "Your" team.  They may be a hometown team for you or your favorite team but you don't own them or pay any of their salaries therefore they are not your's.   I do agree that he may have lost this team but they looked good up until the Second half with Keenum at the helm.  If he retires I want to see it because of his health not because you as a person thinks he can't coach.  Up until this season he took that team from being a punching bag to a contender.  Everyone is allowed a screwed up season.  If he comes back next year and they win the division and are great you will be the one to nominate him for COY.  


JacobJones
JacobJones

@meandmesa Dude, seriously... I don't know Gary Kubiak from Adam.. All I know is, he's hindering my football team, and has for a while, now..

I do, however, think health is priority #1.. IMO, Gary needs to retire, for his health, and the fact that he couldn't outcoach my niece..

meandmesa
meandmesa

@JacobJones Dude. Seriously.  You're addressing his coaching skills after the guy just had a stroke?  For the love of god, if football is more important to you than life, you've got some really effed up priorities.