Posted September 19, 2013

Dashon Goldson has suspension overturned on appeal, will play against Patriots

NFC South, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Dashon Goldson has gotten a reprieve and will play against the Patriots. (Chris O’Meara/AP)

For the second straight season, the NFL has overturned a one-game suspension given to a safety in the name of the league’s safety initiative. Tampa Bay Buccaneers safety Dashon Goldson, suspended by the league on Monday for an egregious hit on New Orleans Saints running back Darren Sproles, has won an appeal and will be able to play against the New England Patriots this Sunday.

According to Alex Marvez of FOX Sports, Matt Birk of the league’s appeal board decided to overturn the suspension and fine Goldson $100,000 instead. Goldson would have lost $264,705.88 in salary had he missed that game. Birk also upheld the $30,000 fine Goldson got for a hit on New York Jets tight end Jeff Cumberland in Week 1. Since 2010, Goldson has more personal fouls (15) than any other NFL player.

“You had an unobstructed path to your opponent,” NFL VP of Football Operations Merton Hanks wrote to Goldson about the hit on Sproles. “It is clear that you lowered your head and unnecessarily rammed the left side of your helmet into the left side of your opponent’s head. You delivered a forceful blow with your helmet and made no attempt whatsoever to wrap up your opponent or make a conventional tackle on the play. This illegal contact clearly could have been avoided.”

Last November, Baltimore Ravens safety Ed Reed won an appeal of his one-game suspension for a hit on Pittsburgh Steelers receiver Emmanuel Sanders. NFL executive vice president of football operations Ray Anderson issued the suspension, and Ted Cottrell of the appeal board overturned it, fining Reed $50,000 instead.

17 comments
JohnStevens
JohnStevens

Soccer issues red cards and ejects the player whose team has to play a man short for the rest of the game.  Two yellow cards equals a red and the player is ejected.  Players can accumulate yellow cards and be forced to miss a game.  That sport takes unnecessarily violent play seriously and punishes not just the individual player, but his team (or her team as it were) as well.  If the NFL were serious about eliminating this kind of play, they would not overturn these suspensions.  I don't even care if they are suspended with pay.  If they are forced to miss games and the bench is a player short, the teams will be more concerned about keeping them available and this violent stuff will be reduced. 

WHO*IS*ESPN
WHO*IS*ESPN

Hanks:"This illegal contact clearly could have been avoided.”

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And then he adds: "we'll take a 100 grand and call it even. Don't do it again"  (wink wink)

WHO*IS*ESPN
WHO*IS*ESPN

So rather than punish the guy for the sake of "safety", you sell out and take his money.  I thought extortion was illegal?

KennethB.Jacobs
KennethB.Jacobs

One day somebody is going to take him out. As you get older, you get a step or two slower and the ole co-ordination drops off just enough to put you in the way of a shot. This guy is known around the league and his time will come!

BobCampbell
BobCampbell

The deal should be that the next time he will be suspended for a minimum of two games. Enough is enough. Times for the rules enforcers toget some balls.

Joe R2
Joe R2

I remember when he KO'd Pierre Thomas in the playoffs a couple years ago.  He's a pretty violent hitter... 

jbc123
jbc123

Someone should return the favor and put this dog down.  I watched that game Sunday, and the hit on the NO tight end by one of the other Tampa DB's was even worse. Seems to be a recurring theme here with Tampa, coach has to take responsibility. The nonsense hit the week before cost them a game against the pathetic Jets, guess that wasn't enough for these tough guys.  My guess is that Logan Mankins will introduce himself  early and often Sunday, that has a way of changing peoples minds.

6marK6
6marK6

Wait for the punishment and then appeal. Your punishment will automatically be reduced substantially. Why? Uhh, because you appealed?

Pat11
Pat11

15 personal fouls in 3 years and they let him walk. Repeat head hunter. Yeah the league really needs to wait until someone is crippled or worse they hand out a measly 1 game suspension. Dont give me that weak argument about this is "football", if they are so tough when why did ex players sue for 2 billion dollar s.

l.czolgosz66
l.czolgosz66

The guy has been penalized for this on multiple occasions. The hit was clearly dirty. So, why is the punishment magically reduced just because he appealed?

Sully320
Sully320

This sounds like a pretty dangerous play.  Someone made a good suggestion -- rather than fining the player, suspend him WITH pay.  This affects the team and the owner -- who has to pay the guy to sit on the bench -- and may thus affect the coaching of that behavior.  And a player would rather pay a fine than sit, even if he gets paid.

Neem
Neem

@Joe R2 Hey dumbass...that was Donte Witner who laid that hit...and it was legal..

Noah1
Noah1

@Pat11 Though I dont disagree with you but your final sentence has me laughing. Money can make the toughest person in the world a little baby. We live in a money hungry world. Simply put, the ex players pissed their millions away and now find a way to get more money from the league...tough has nothing to do with it

Rob62
Rob62

@l.czolgosz66More likely, it was reduced because Goldson was able to argue that Ed Reed's case set precedent.  $100k is no small fine, even for a guy making as much as Goldson.  He does need to learn how to start hitting guys in the chest instead of the noggin though.  The league probably won't let him off again.