Posted August 29, 2013

Ranking the QBs: Aaron Rodgers is still the top man

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It's Aaron Rodgers' world -- the rest of the NFL just lives in it. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

It’s Aaron Rodgers’ world — the rest of the NFL just lives in it. (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

1. Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers

Put simply, Rodgers is in the prime of a career defined by a rare (and perhaps unprecedented) combination of game intelligence, functional mobility, and ridiculous deep ball accuracy. More than any other quarterback on this list, he has the ability to transcend everything around him and excel. Bad offensive line? Lack of a running game? Receivers in and out? Rodgers seems to tune it all out. The hope for the Packers is that the additions of rookie backs Eddie Lacy and Johnathan Franklin will balance that offense out, but the team revolves around the best quarterback in the league, and — yes, it could already be argued — one of the best of all time.

2. Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos

Yes, we’re basing a great deal of Manning’s high ranking on his remarkable recovery from the surgeries than kept him out of the league for the entire 2011 season, but this is also about the targets he has around him. When you combine Manning’s fanatical football knowledge with receivers Demaryius Thomas, Eric Decker, and Wes Welker, you have a group of factors ready to wow the NFL.

3. Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints

In the hands of most other quarterbacks, Brees’ 2012 season would have been an abject disaster. BountyGate was perhaps the most franchise-depleting sports story since the Black Sox scandal, and New Orleans’ defense was an embarrassment. Brees was without Sean Payton, his head coach and offensive partner. And yet, the man as able as any in league history to make those around him look better than they are still got it done, with his third season of more than 5,000 passing yards in the last five years, and his second in a row. The best thing that can be said of Brees is the best thing that can be said of any quarterback — everyone who plays around him is made better by his presence and ability.

BURKE: Ranking the NFL’s backfields from best to worst 

4. Tom Brady, New England Patriots

Tom Brady fourth? Well, one tends to wonder just how far the Fates can push this guy. Wes Welker is in Denver, Rob Gronkowski is in injury purgatory, Aaron Hernandez is in Rolling Stone magazine for all the wrong reasons, and his leading preseason receivers are undrafted rookie Kenbrell Thompkins, second-round rookie Aaron Dobson, longtime reserve Julian Edelman, and impressive but injury-prone Danny Amendola. And when the 2013 season is done, they might be his leading regular-season receivers, as well. We all know how great Brady is, and that offense will get better once he gets on the same page with his new guys, but New England’s offense is terribly dependent on complex routes that require time and chemistry. It could be a rocky start this year.

5. Joe Flacco, Baltimore Ravens

Now that Flacco has hit that nebulous “elite” designation, the question remains: Will he be the quarterback who enjoyed one of the best postseasons in NFL history, the uber-talented but inconsistent passer he was before, or a combination of the two? Probably the combo, and it doesn’t help that Flacco lost Anquan Boldin to the 49ers and Dennis Pitta to a hip injury that will either end his season or take him out for most of it. If Flacco wants to be in the upper echelon, he’ll have to do what the guys above him have done — make those around him better on an every-down basis. He’s never really been tasked with that before.

6. Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons  

Before the 2012 season, I considered Ryan to be an “in-the-box” quarterback — a guy with tremendous physical talent and football intelligence, but saddled with certain physical limitations (primarily a lack of functional mobility) that kept him as a player who couldn’t always overcome serious adversity. Those questions will likely remain until and unless Ryan’s Falcons win a Super Bowl (or get very close), but there was clear improvement last season. Atlanta’s offense was defined more by the pass (especially on first down), and Ryan proved that he was a complete pocket passer by working more efficiently to throw his receivers open. Yes, he’s got a lot of talent in those receivers, but he’s now helping them as much as they’re helping him.

7. Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh Steelers

When we talk about “rare” quarterbacks, we often mean players whose skill sets are almost without precedent. Roethlisberger is exactly that type of player. When was the last time you saw an NFL quarterback this able to make stick throws with defenders hanging all over him (frequently as the result of a well-below-average offensive line), and able to convert those throws into important plays under negative coverage circumstances? It would be nice for Big Ben if his protection was better and if he hadn’t lost Mike Wallace to free agency, but you can expect him to play successfully — and quite unconventionally — until he hits the inevitable wall that comes from playing so physically outside of structure.

8. Eli Manning, New York Giants

Ten years into his NFL career, it could be argued that Manning doesn’t do any one thing at an “OMG” level, but he does everything required of a quarterback more than well enough to consistently succeed. Perhaps his most important attribute — and it’s one that many more talented quarterbacks don’t have — is his selective amnesia. Manning remembers the elements of a bad play (or a series of bad plays) that are important to improvement, but he doesn’t seem to let them get him down. More than any other quarterback in our Top 10, Manning seems to have important traits that are tough to quantify.

9. Tony Romo, Dallas Cowboys

I’ve made the point before that Romo may be the only NFL player who is overrated and underrated at the same time. For all the talk about his alleged inability to perform in clutch situations, he’s actually done so with above-average efficiency through the last half-decade. His DVOA, (Football Outsiders’ opponent-adjusted efficiency metric) is better than the norm in late and close situations (defined as any play in the second half or overtime with the score within eight points). Some of Romo’s foibles are his responsibility, but he’s been given a sub-par offensive line and inconsistent receivers, as well.

10. Andrew Luck, Indianapolis Colts

In his rookie season, Luck threw a lot of long passes and took a lot of hits — more than what you’d generally expect of a first-year quarterback. His relatively high interception rate should be seen in that context, as well as the fact that he was playing behind a vulnerable offensive line and throwing to undefined targets, Reggie Wayne aside. New offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton will bring aspects of Luck’s former system at Stanford to the Colts, so expect higher efficiency and fewer explosive plays.

11. Matt Schaub, Houston Texans

Schaub has quietly become one of the NFL’s most prolific quarterbacks from a yardage perspective, but the next step for him is to become a more effective passer in the red zone — and that’s an issue that has reared its head this preseason. Schaub is a surprisingly mobile quarterback who thrives on the Texans’ boot-action passing game, and he’s at his best when Gary Kubiak’s offense is balanced.

12. Robert Griffin III, Washington Redskins

Putting Griffin at #12 obviously assumes that his knee will be in great shape for the 2013 season, and he’s projected to start the Redskins’ season opener against the Philadelphia Eagles. When healthy, Griffin presents an unprecedented degree of difficulty for any defensive coordinator. Not only does he have demon speed on designed runs, but he runs option and Pistol packages to perfection, and the Redskins were the most effective play-action team in the league last season. One of the primary reasons for this is Griffin’s propensity for testing defenses deep after they bite on run fakes. If he learns when to throw the ball away and move on to the next play, he has a better chance to stay in the game … and to continue to present nightmare scenarios for Washington’s opponents.

13. Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions

Stafford is one of two quarterbacks in NFL history to throw for more than 4,950 yards in two consecutive seasons — Drew Brees is the other — but the 2012 season in which Stafford matriculated his team for 4,967 passing yards is seen as an overall negative by many because his touchdown total plummeted from 41 in 2011 to 20 last season. Stafford plays from the shotgun more than anyone else in the league, often goes with single-read looks (though he is capable of more), and has inconsistent mechanics that cause him to break down under pressure. He’s got all the talent required of the position, but he’s still putting it all together.

14. Russell Wilson, Seattle Seahawks

It would take an exceptional set of circumstances for an allegedly too-short quarterback, selected 75th in the 2012 draft, to end the season tying Peyton Manning’s rookie record for touchdown passes, but that’s exactly what Wilson did. The Seahawks kept him under wraps early in the season, but Wilson proved that he could run an offense soon enough. Wilson rolled out of the pocket on 25 percent of his passing attempts, by far the highest percentage in the league last year, so we’ll see what defenses to do contain that.

15. Colin Kaepernick, San Francisco 49ers

2013 marks Kaepernick’s third year in the league, but his first year as a starter from the opening game, and his second season as a starter at all. Jim Harbaugh and Greg Roman meshed Kaepernick’s running speed and deep arm perfectly with a complex series of blocking schemes on the way to a near-Super Bowl win. But the 49ers have some fairly serious receiver issues this season, and Kaepernick may have to make more plays on the fly with his arm as defenses look to tack the box until he forces them to go with a different plan.

16. Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers

Newton set all kinds of rookie records in 2011, but his sophomore campaign could only be seen as a disappointment. Beyond Newton’s performance, there were two primary reasons for this — first, former offensive coordinator Rob Chudzinski went away from the run-based passing game that helped Newton so much the year before, and the routes Carolina’s receivers were running often tasked Newton to make deep timing throws he simply could not. New offensive coordinator Mike Shula, formerly Newton’s quarterback coach, wants to set things right schematically, and make the most of Newton’s arm and rushing ability. Newton’s part of that bargain? He must make better decisions and become more accurate on long passes.

17. Jay Cutler, Chicago Bears

Cutler may be the NFL’s best arm talent, but a strong of offensive systems and poor pass protection — not to mention mechanics you wouldn’t wish on a fourth-grader — have conspired to lead to his underachievement at times. New Bears head coach Marc Trestman, a longtime quarterback guru, will try to set things right.

18. Philip Rivers, San Diego Chargers

Like Cutler, Rivers is an estimably talented signal-caller who has been let down by his protection over the last few seasons. And like Cutler, he’ll try to get things fixed with a new head coach known for helping quarterbacks in former Denver Broncos offensive coordinator Mike McCoy.

FARRAR: New system in San Diego could help Rivers set things right again 

19. Carson Palmer, Arizona Cardinals

Palmer goes from a fairly nightmarish Raiders offense (in which he was surprisingly productive) to a Cardinals team with an excellent offensive coach in charge of things (head coach Bruce Arians) and a pretty decent cadre of receivers. Could be a rebound for a guy who’s been under the radar for the last few seasons.

20. Michael Vick, Philadelphia Eagles

Vick would seem to be a perfect match for Chip Kelly’s high-tempo offense, especially given the complexity of the running game. He’s still got an amazing arm, and if Kelly can corral his more questionable on-field tendencies, we could see the best of Vick in 2013.

21. Alex Smith, Kansas City Chiefs

Smith is what he is, and nothing more — not a top-level quarterback, but a smart, efficient player with a decent arm and a need for things to be working around him. New Chiefs head coach Andy Reid has excelled through his career with such players.

22. Andy Dalton, Cincinnati Bengals

This is the year for Dalton to hit the proverbial next level. He’s got the best young receiver in the game in A.J. Green, a good offensive line, a rookie tight end in Tyler Eifert, and an improving running game. If the Bengals are to advance in the postseason, it’s on Dalton to improve his decisions under pressure and strike more consistently on intermediate and deeper throws.

23. Sam Bradford, St. Louis Rams

There are many in the league who still believe in Bradford, despite the fact that the first overall pick in the 2010 NFL draft really hasn’t lived up to the promise he showed in college. He’s gone through a laundry list of offensive coordinators, receivers, and blockers. Bradford has the arm to lead the Rams to a higher level — the question is whether he has the weapons around him, and whether three years of bad overall offense has made him gun-shy.

24. Josh Freeman, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Freeman is perhaps the most frustrating quarterback in the league. He alternates between jags of outstanding play, and times when you want to hide your eyes. He’s under the gun in 2013, and if he doesn’t perform, rookie Mike Glennon has a shot to usurp him in the long term.

25. Ryan Tannehill, Miami Dolphins

Tannehill is great when it comes to rolling out of the pocket and throwing under pressure. Now, he needs to advance his pocket presence and focus.

26. Brandon Weeden, Cleveland Browns

At Oklahoma State, Weeden was a first-read guy who stared down his receivers and benefitted from a fairly simple offense. Like most quarterbacks under these circumstances, the adjustment to the NFL has been a process. Weeden has stretches of fine play, but he telegraphs too much and breaks down when defenses get difficult. He needs to build on his impressive ability to stand in the pocket and make deep throws.

27. Christian Ponder, Minnesota Vikings

In his third year, Ponder is a mixed bag at best — when he’s on, he’s an efficient game manager in the Alex Smith mold. When things go south, he does not possess the physical tools to improvise in special ways. The Vikings completed just 28 passes of 20 yards or more, by far the lowest total in the NFL. Ponder’s a mobile guy, but one expects more of a quarterback when every opposing defense is focused almost entirely on stopping Adrian Peterson.

28. Jake Locker, Tennessee Titans

Locker’s pocket presence hasn’t improved much from his days at Washington. He’s a superlative athlete who’s always been better at the occasional shot play than with the play-to-play consistency that the NFL requires.

29. EJ Manuel, Buffalo Bills

If he’s healthy, Manuel will start for the Bills in his rookie season. At Florida State, he was an inconsistent quarterback, though he has a good head for the game and impressed a lot of people at the Senior Bowl.

30. Blaine Gabbert, Jacksonville Jaguars

Through two NFL seasons, Gabbert has shown very little. Now, he’s not just fighting for a starting spot in Jacksonville — he’s battling to prove that he can play in this league at all.

31. Mark Sanchez, New York Jets

Sanchez hasn’t proven much more, though he’s certainly paid like he has. He’s got a reasonably good arm, but his decision-making processes can be unfortunate under the best of circumstances, and one wonders if he’ll ever succeed without a change of scenery. This is as much Geno Smith’s job as it is Sanchez’s, and it’s far more Smith’s job over time.

32. Terrelle Pryor, Oakland Raiders

The Raiders traded for Matt Flynn in the offseason, but Pryor has surprised a lot of people by outplaying Flynn behind a horrid offensive line. Pryor has a long way to go as a pure passer, but he’s mobile and gutsy, and with the Raiders, that’s enough for now.

70 comments
DBR96A
DBR96A

Regarding Ben Roethlisberger vis-a-vis Matt Ryan and Joe Flacco, consider the following facts:


1. The Steelers have not ranked in the top 10 in total rushing yards or YPC since 2007.

2. Four of the five starting offensive linemen for the Steelers in Super Bowl XLIII are now out of the NFL, and none due to old age either.

3. In Super Bowl XLIII, the Steelers had a whopping 58 rushing yards and 2.2 YPC.

4. Santonio Holmes has only one 1,000-yard receiving season in his career.

5. In 2010 and the first half of 2011 (24 games), Mike Wallace had 2,057 receiving yards and 15 TD catches. Since then (23 games), he's only had 1,229 receiving yards and 11 TD catches.

6. Despite a 3-1 record without Roethlisberger in 2010, the Steelers offense averaged 18.0 points and 269 yards per game without him, versus 22.9 points and 370 yards per game with him.

7. In 2010, the Steelers had the most penalized offensive line in the NFL.

8. Two of the three turnovers by the Steelers in Super Bowl XLV were directly attributed to poor blocking.

9. In 2011, the Steelers had more starting offensive line permutations than any other team in the NFL.

10. In 2012, only four teams had fewer TD runs than the Steelers, and only two teams had fewer TDs scored by all means other than the pass.

11. In 2012, the Steelers offense averaged 22.2 points per game when Roethlisberger started, and 13.3 points per game when he did not start.

12. Per ESPN Insider, the Steelers had the least-healthy RB corps and the third-least-healthy offensive line in the NFL in 2012.

13. The Steelers used a first-round draft pick in 2010, a second-round pick in 2011, and first- and second-round picks in 2012 on offensive linemen. All four of them missed multiple games to injury in 2012, and three of the four missed the majority of the season.

14. The Steelers have ranked in the bottom half of the NFL in average starting field position in each of the last two seasons.

15. Since 2008, the Steelers have a record of 48-23 (.676) when Ben Roethlisberger starts, and a record of 5-4 (.556) when he does not.

16. Andrew Luck was the most "hit" QB in the NFL in 2012, illustrating once and for all just how QB-unfriendly Bruce Arians' system of offense is. Roethlisberger played in Arians' system from 2007 through 2011.


Roethlisberger has been just as efficient and productive as either of those other two QBs despite having vastly inferior weapons on offense. Yay, he has a good defense; unfortunately, he's never on the field with them. Besides, the defense better be good, considering that's where the lion's share of the non-QB talent has been for the last five years. Matt Ryan and Joe Flacco would be sausage if they swapped offenses with Roethlisberger at any time in the last five years.

x72
x72

Concussion Boy Rodgers won't make it thru the season

forcedentry
forcedentry

Having Matt Schaub ahead of the stable of young guns is ridiculous. Of course, he has more experience than they do. But, he has NO WHERE NEAR the talent. Do you think if you supplanted Matt onto the 2-14 Colts...5-11 Redskins...that they would be good teams and go to the playoffs the next year!? Please. He is an average QB at best, more in the class of Dalton, Bradford, and Cutler.

JasonA.Mirabella
JasonA.Mirabella

This seems to be more of an overall offense ranking. If we're ranking quarterbacks, nothing else should matter. Why would Tom Brady be penalized for having lesser receivers. If we're ranking quarterbacks, what we should be asking is, all things being equal, who is the best at that position?

I see this same logic in college team rankings that rank certain teams higher than other because they have an easier schedule and are therefore likely to be ranked higher at the end of the season. But that's a prediction, not a ranking of who the better team is. I have the same problem with this list. It's predictive, it's not ranking the best quarterbacks. 

pvs
pvs

I think analysts and fans underestimate the ability of Brady to coach and connect with new offensive personnel. What will they say when the Pats offense continues to put up 30+ points a game and Brady does not miss a beat with the new and unproven receiver.......would he move up to 2nd or 3rd on the list?

JosephBagadoughnutz
JosephBagadoughnutz

one thing not being mentioned is the pats now have a decent ground games

seasonschange
seasonschange

Context seems like a difficult thing to establish in a blanket ranking like this. I think he did a pretty good job ranking the quarterbacks overall. Ponder at 27, struggles mightily, with the best running back in the league. Alex Smith 21, efficiency over effectiveness. Josh Freeman 24, crazy good and crazy bad. Flacco 5, had a superb run in the playoffs but shows inconsistency during the season. Rodgers 1, had a running game his first two seasons and then put up ridiculous numbers without one for three years.

It's all subjective based on performance of team, management, quarterback. No defenses are mentioned that provide many turnovers. Nor are special teams. It would be interesting to see all of these features combined with the quarterback's standing.

JasonBerntson
JasonBerntson

This is actually one of the better lists of this sort I've seen. It seems nobody will ever be satisfied with a list like this, yet if they made a list of their own, everybody would hate it too. I think Flacco at #5 is still too high. Yeah, he had an amazing postseason, but I would like to see him do that on a more consistent basis in the regular season, and improve his accuracy (sub-60% in the modern NFL?), before I put him above players like Ryan and Roethlisberger. I think at this point, I don't know what else Ryan has to prove to be an elite QB. Win a Super Bowl I guess, because that's all people care about. He's prone to the occasional awful game, but even Peyton Manning threw 6 INTs once. Flacco should be moved down to #9 - yes, right below Romo. Ok, I'll accept him at #8, but no higher. Eli Manning is basically a better version of Flacco statistically (cool in the clutch and with a great playoff record, but still frustratingly inconsistent at times, and not as accurate as you would like).

I also think Alex Smith is too low. He doesn't have the upside of Cutler or Rivers, but he's played much better in the last 2 seasons than either of them. He may end up being the product of a system, but his excellent ball protection ability won't go away with the Chiefs. He may not make many big plays, but his accuracy should stay high and his interception rate low, even if they're not as good as before. Carson Palmer's days as a difference-maker are over (all stats, no substance), and while Vick could thrive in Kelly's scheme, I'm much too worried about his propensity for turnovers to be comfortable putting him above Smith right now. I would also flip Cutler and Rivers, because at least Rivers has shown that he's capable of playing at an elite level in the recent past.

One last point, I would put Luck currently below RGIII and Wilson, and Wilson probably right above RGIII (mostly because of the injury concern). Luck I think has the highest ceiling, but until he proves that he's better on the field, I have to put him lower.

Also, I still think Flynn should start over Pryor (at least Flynn has shown that he can play in the regular season), but no matter who they start, the Raiders will be awful, so maybe it doesn't matter.

Other than these points, I have no real problems with this list. I won't even complain about Brady below Brees, because I worry a lot about their turnover at the receiver position. Of course, he'll probably come out and prove us all wrong by looking as sharp as always, but then maybe we'll be proven that even Brady is mortal.

So here would be my list:

1) Aaron Rodgers
2) Peyton Manning
3) Tom Brady
4) Drew Brees
5) Matt Ryan
6) Ben Roethlisberger
7) Eli Manning
8) Tony Romo
9) Joe Flacco
10) Matt Schaub
11) Russell Wilson
12) Robert Griffin III
13) Matthew Stafford
14) Colin Kaepernick
15) Andrew Luck
16) Cam Newton
17) Alex Smith
18) Philip Rivers
19) Jay Cutler
20) Andy Dalton
21) Carson Palmer
22) Michael Vick
23) Sam Bradford
24) Josh Freeman
25) Ryan Tannehill
26) Christian Ponder
27) Brandon Weeden
28) Jake Locker
29) E.J. Manuel
30) Blaine Gabbert
31) Mark Sanchez
32) Terrelle Pryor (if Matt Flynn starts, I would put him at #29)

HunterBishop
HunterBishop

Brady at fourth is waaaay too low. Below Rodgers, I get. But Brees and Manning? I don't think that's right. 

Gabbert ahead of Sanchez is also strange. Sanchez has been MUCH better than Gabbert, by leaps and bounds. 

Sam Bradford should not be ahead of Josh Freeman. Andy Dalton has been twice the QB Carson Palmer has been over the past few years. Joe Flacco is NOT a better QB than Big Ben, Matt Ryan, and Eli Manning. 

therednorth1
therednorth1

I'm assuming you're ranking these quarterbacks for fantasy purposes only, because this certainly isn't a ranking of quarterbacks purely based on their talent.

TheRealSheizman
TheRealSheizman

The top 4 are easy, although I would go Rodgers, Brady, Brees, Manning. The next 12 or so could be debated. Depending on your criteria, you could make a case for a lot of guys. Big Ben has to be ranked high. He always has a pathetic O Line but turns lemons into lemonade. I personally think Luck will be a 1st ballot HOF barring injury, so I would have him up there as well. Terrible D, zero run game and they still win 11. I like the young QBs a lot, but Luck is in a class by himself. Ryan and Flacco are better QBs than the extremely inconsistent E Manning and Romo. No way on earth Schaub should be higher than Wilson, Kap, Newton, RG3 or even Stafford. Give any of those guys the Texans and they do better than Schaub. No matter where guys are ranked, I am pumped football is back!

friendly--neighborhood--scrawler
friendly--neighborhood--scrawler

Now show me the list of good human beings, I would be curious to see where Aaron ranked. I am still waiting to see what Aaron will do with his 2013-'14 Salary. Put you money where your mouth is clown

MinisterWilliamAaronBerryIII
MinisterWilliamAaronBerryIII

WE WILL SEE HOW THE SEASON GOES! All of this speculation is of NO value to reality of a great NFL season of wins & loses & how teams respond to adversity that they may face.

16. Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers

Newton set all kinds of rookie records in 2011, but his sophomore campaign could only be seen as a disappointment. Beyond Newton’s performance, there were two primary reasons for this — first, former offensive coordinator Rob Chudzinski went away from the run-based passing game that helped Newton so much the year before, and the routes Carolina’s receivers were running often tasked Newton to make deep timing throws he simply could not. New offensive coordinator Mike Shula, formerly Newton’s quarterback coach, wants to set things right schematically, and make the most of Newton’s arm and rushing ability. Newton’s part of that bargain? He must make better decisions and become more accurate on long passes.


ggslor
ggslor

Tom Brady4th????     

If you knew anything about football who  would you want to take last drive  



 Really/ Really?    


  I would suggest Coach Belicheck knows  a shade more than you  


Best wishes always   


 GGS  

ArchieStewart
ArchieStewart

Russell Wilson and Peyton Manning tied for the rookie touchdown record, however; Russell Wilson had 10 interceptions compared to 28 rookie interceptions for Peyton Manning.   Russell Wilson was a better rookie quarterback than Peyton manning was.    

RichBich
RichBich

Kaepernick doesn't belong on this list. He's like a Hyaundi who made it's way onto the Mercedes Benz show room floor., has a flat tire, and people don't wanna touch it.  He was made to look good by what Alex Smith did for most of the season until Whack Job Harbaugh benched Alex. Seems people want to forget that Kaepernick hasn't played a full season AND lost the 49ers 1st ever super bowl.

Sobo
Sobo

"LMAO !!!!! "

-Everybody after reading #5

donniejohnson4
donniejohnson4

Andrew Luck completed 47 percent of his passes in five December games last season.  That guy was not good.  How could he be ranked tenth? It's almost as if everyone is afraid to be honest about the kid, because they all predicted he would be the greatest and they don't want to look like they were wrong.  That's why folks are making so many excuses for him.  Oh it's because of the type of offense he runs.  Never heard that excuse for anyone else, but OKAY. 

jkearneyiii
jkearneyiii

Flacco 5?   No more jump ball catches without Boldin?    Kap and Wilson about even with Cutler?  Stafford is elite.

This is clueless.

NoQNoSuperBowl
NoQNoSuperBowl

Peyton does not deserve to be 2. Did anyone watch him in the last Q and OT of the playoff game. His passes looked like Tebows. HOF quarterback for sure but no longer ahead of Brees, Brady or Eli.

jason2
jason2

ryan ahead of ben and eli is a joke

jbloxom33
jbloxom33

A Roger is the man packers 4 life

ChrisMez
ChrisMez

[Eli] Manning seems to have important traits that are tough to quantify."  yea, 2 super bowl winning drives with less than 3 minutes to go!

blasphemy but i think Sanchez is way too low.  you can't blame him because the Jets have no talent and lousy coaches and front office.  

JVP3122
JVP3122

Flacco is number 5?  Come on, now.  Furthermore, Flacco is not elite.  Winning the Super Bowl didn't automatically make him elite, and with his numbers he was not an elite quarterback before that game.  Matt Ryan without a doubt is a better quarterback, as are some others on this list.

TellyBums
TellyBums

any rankings with ROMO in the top 10 you can just disregard!! SI must have had nothing else to post today but this garbage!! 

Tom_Weiland
Tom_Weiland

Romo (9), Cutler (17) and Ponder (27) are too high on the list!

GSR1191
GSR1191

While i agree Flacco CAN BE GREAT at times...he is just waaaayyyyy to inconsistent to be #5. I mean he had a game last year where he didn't get a 1st down until mid way through the 3rd qtr.  And then he will go out and have a game with 120 passer rating. He is top 10 for sure...but 5 is just to high

Thunder7ga
Thunder7ga

Romo 9th?  He's barely a top 20.

Scramble
Scramble

The only reason Rodgers had a chance to win his only super bowl appearance was because the Giants blew a big lead to the Eagles and lost. Rodgers should be giving Eli the Lombardi just for giving him his only chance. He will probably be just another Marino.

TheRealSheizman
TheRealSheizman

@JasonBerntson Good list, except fpr Luck at 15. He is so much better than Schaub it is scary. You say he hasn't proven it on the field but he took a horrible 2-14 with no D or running game and won 11 games. Griffin, Wilson and Kap all were put in great situations with excellent talent around them. Luck had to do it all by himself. He'll do it again this year. If he stays healthy, he's a HOF QB.

Indybeck
Indybeck

@HunterBishop Gronk is injured. Welker is gone. Hernandez is gone. RBs are questionable.

JasonBerntson
JasonBerntson

@HunterBishop Actually, Gabbert's 2012 season was pretty on par with Sanchez's career average, and was much better last season. His rookie year was awful, but at least with Gabbert there's still some potential, whereas with Sanchez, anybody who's not still blinded by his pre-draft potential will see that he's already peaked, and is on his way back down.

JasonBerntson
JasonBerntson

@ArchieStewart That's true, but to be fair, the NFL is much different now than it was then. Wilson benefited from a modern NFL that has begun to embrace read-option plays and unique offensive designs that benefit mobile quarterbacks like Wilson and ease the NFL learning curve from college. Also, Russell Wilson threw 393 passes on a running-oriented team that went 11-5 and nearly made it to the NFC Championship Game, whereas Peyton Manning threw 575 passes (the most in the NFL that year) on an awful team that was in full rebuild mode and went 3-13. Manning was asked to do a lot more than Wilson. I am very high on Wilson's potential though, and I never bought the BS that he was "too short" to play.

silverpen00
silverpen00

@RichBich Your car metaphor is stupid. Doesn't even make any sense - clearly you know nothing of what has gone on in SF football for the last decade. How are you even criticizing a coach and QB that got to the Super Bowl in the first place?

And, since the obvious escaped you, Kaepernick does belong on the list because this is a ranking of starting QBs, which Kaep is. Duh.

Fedorg4s
Fedorg4s

@donniejohnson4 11 wins and few lucky come from behind wins. (games they got behind because of the mistakes he made) Oh yea and a joke of a schedule with 4 games vs Titans and Jags and a bunch of other AFC misfits... I'm not sold on him, RGIII and Wilson both were way more impressive last year. 

Fedorg4s
Fedorg4s

@NoQNoSuperBowl Peyton is amazing, but people do overlook his playoff short comings. I agree he was terrible that fourth quarter and OT when he had several chances to put them game away. 

JVP3122
JVP3122

@jason2 I don't see how it is considering he's currently a better passer than both.

JasonBerntson
JasonBerntson

@ChrisMez I don't get these Sanchez apologists. A lousy team and a lousy organization only carry so much weight. Sanchez is far past the point of redemption. He's awful and has always been awful. Sanchez is just as much a part of the problem with the Jets as anybody else.

JasonBerntson
JasonBerntson

@Tom_Weiland I agree with you on Cutler, but Ponder is better than Gabbert, Sanchez, Locker, an untested rookie, and whoever the hell the Raiders put on the field. Also the kinds of people who think that Romo is a bad quarterback are the kinds of people that probably don't actually watch football games.

Scramble
Scramble

@Thunder7ga Romo is better than you think. The Cowboys really haven't been a good team with horrible management problems. You put him on the Ravens for the last five years and they probably have three super bowl appearances.

JasonBerntson
JasonBerntson

@TheRealSheizman @JasonBerntson I realize he was put on a bad team and brought them to 11-5, and was asked to do a lot, probably too much. Either way, his accuracy was still around 54% (which is worrying even with how much he was forced to throw) and he still threw 18 interceptions to 23 TDs. He definitely has the most potential to move up my list, but for all intents and purposes, he wasn't as good as the other big rookie QBs and Kaep, and Schaub at the very least has proven that he's a good QB for several consecutive years. I can't put any of the rookies above him quite yet, but this should be the season they make it (wouldn't be surprised if all 3 of them are indisputable top 10 QBs by season's end).

pvs
pvs

@Indybeck @HunterBishop You obviously do not follow the Pats. Gronk will miss 3 maybe 4 games. Welker will soon be forgotten with the addition of Amendola (he has more upside than Welker). Pats have found a diamond in the rough with UDFA TE Zach Sudfeld (the next up and coming star on the offense). UDFA WR Thompkins is an amazing deep threat and is already on the same page as Brady. WR Dobson and Boyce have shown great promise as deep threat options......and by the way, the Pats 7th ranked running game just got stronger with the addition of Blount and Washington. I do not think you know much about the Pats......the offense will still score 30+ points per game.

unitcaptain11
unitcaptain11

@JasonBerntson @ArchieStewart  

Wilson tied the rookie TD pass record on a team that was LAST IN THE NFL in pass attempts.  That is a big big big deal!  LAST in pass attempts! And no rookie has ever thrown for more TDs than Wilson did! And he did it with the fewest pass attempts in the NFL!

If RG3 or Luck had done that, there would be  special Gatorade commercials and tv shows all about it.  

JasonBerntson
JasonBerntson

@Fedorg4s @NoQNoSuperBowl And lots of other people overlook all the great performances that Peyton Manning has had in the playoffs.

When was the last time Brady won anything? Last time I checked, he stunk it up in all of the Patriots' recent playoff losses.

DBR96A
DBR96A

@JVP3122 @jason2  Last season Matt Ryan was marginally more efficient than Ben Roethlisberger despite having vastly superior weapons on offense.