Posted September 25, 2012

Replacement refs botch Packers-Seahawks ending

Green Bay Packers, Seattle Seahawks

One referee ruled an interception by Packers safety M.D. Jennings. Another ruled it a touchdown by Golden Tate. (CSM /LANDOV)

Who knows what was going through Roger Goodell’s head on Monday night as he fiddled while the integrity of his league burned to the ground. There can be no more denying the undeniable: The presence of replacement officials has significantly impacted the NFL’s product on the field.

Until this debacle between the Packers and Seahawks, the replacement officials were a nuisance, a punch line. They had not, aside from some randomly incorrect calls here and there, directly impacted a game’s outcome.

And then Monday’s final play happened.

With the Seahawks down five and the clock ticking to zero, Russell Wilson scrambled around and heaved one to the end zone. Golden Tate, who earlier had two potential TD passes slip out of his hands, shoved a defender to the ground and then leaped into the air. Green Bay’s M.D. Jennings beat him to the punch, plucking Wilson’s pass from the pile and tumbling to the ground.

Tate, in an act of desperation, reached around Jennings to put his hands on the ball too.

To just about everyone watching, including one of the officials on the field, it was a clear interception. But the call? Touchdown. Seattle wins.

“I had a feeling it was going to be a touchdown,” Wilson told ESPN after the game ended. “We came too far for it not to be a touchdown.”

Destiny is one thing. This was highway robbery.

The play was reviewed — normally, the ruling that Tate and Jennings had simultaneously possessed the football, resulting in a catch is not reviewable; however, the circumstances are different in the end zone, which the NFL confirmed in a statement Monday afternoon:

“In the end zone, a ruling of a simultaneous catch is reviewable.  That is not the case in the field of play, only in the end zone. Referee Wayne Elliott determined that no indisputable visual evidence existed to overturn the call on the field, and as a result, the on-field ruling of touchdown stood.”

And here’s how the NFL explains simultaneous possession in its rule book:

“If a pass is caught simultaneously by two eligible opponents, and both players retain it, the ball belongs to the passers,” the rule states. “It is not a simultaneous catch if a player gains control first and an opponent subsequently gains joint control.”

So, the Seahawks took the win. Only not before a hectic, unbelievable few moments in which the Packers left the field, Seahawks coach Pete Carroll started doing interviews, and the officials huddled to determine that the game could not end without Seattle attempting an extra point.

Eventually, the Seahawks did so, adding a meaningless point for a 14-12 victory.

But even if that’s how the game will look in the record books, there’s no way to sweep under the rug the complete sham that led us there.

“This is wrong,” a clearly agitated Jon Gruden said on ESPN’s broadcast as he, Mike Tirico and Austin railed against the late-game officiating. “I don’t feel good about this.”

Who does? Maybe the Seahawks, who moved to 2-1 — heck, I’m sure the 1972 Russian basketball team celebrated in style after its eternally controversial win over the United States.

Monday’s game was not rigged. The officials did not purposely make it so Seattle walked off with a victory in front of its raucous home crowd. They simply blew the biggest call of the NFL weekend, on a Monday night in front of a massive TV audience.

“I didn’t see it, just saw the reaction like most people, obviously the communication was that (the Packers) had the ball,” Green Bay head coach Mike McCarthy said. “I still haven’t seen the replay of the play. I was told MD Jennings intercepted the ball.

“I’ve never seen anything like that in all my years of football.”

“It seemed like at first, from my vantage point, the referee in the back, I saw him waving his arms over his head which means he was calling touchback,” Aaron Rodgers said. “No idea how the other guy said touchdown to Golden Tate on the replay. He obviously takes his arm off whatever part of the ball he may or may not have had.”

Rodgers wasn’t the only Packer player to comment.

“It’s the old cliche, when there’s smoke there’s fire,” B.J. Raji said “… Right now it’s a tough pill to swallow, but we’ll get over it.”

“I can’t get fined if I’m saying that the refs did a great job … so they did a great job,” Greg Jennings added, sarcastically. Other Packers players, most notably T.J. Yang, lashed out with expletive-filled rants on Twitter.

Seattle did nothing wrong here, mind you. In fact, the Seahawks turned in an inspired effort for much of the night, totally derailing Green Bay’s offense in the first half en route to a 7-0 halftime lead, then getting a clutch stop late to set up the Wilson-to-Tate dramatics.

Under normal circumstances, a Seahawks win on Monday night would have left us talking about their resurgent defense, Wilson rallying late after going nearly two quarters without a completion, or the amazing Seattle home crowd.

Unfortunately, the NFL’s standoff with its normal officials has made the preseason and the first three weeks of the season anything but normal.

Rodgers, too, could have walked out of Monday night’s game as a hero. His offense flipped the script in the third quarter, committing the run game after struggling through the air early. Using that approach, the Packers scored on three straight possessions and completely dominated from halftime until late in the fourth quarter — at one point, Green Bay had run 40 second-half plays to Seattle’s six, with the 40th being a TD run from Cedric Benson to put the Packers ahead, 12-7.

Seattle tried to respond, aided by a roughing-the-passer penalty and egregious pass interference call (one that came just moments after a similarly questionable call went against the Seahawks to keep Green Bay’s TD drive alive).

In the end, it looked like Seattle would come up just short. With time for just one last play and 24 yards shy of the end zone, the Seahawks needed a miracle.

They got it — thanks to a miraculously bad call.

And now, even though TV ratings continue to soar through the roof and fans keep packing NFL stadiums coast to coast, the league and commissioner Roger Goodell must answer for their mistakes.

The replacement officials are doing the best jobs they can, but they are in way, way over their heads. That much was apparent to most of us even before Monday’s catastrophe.

We can only hope that Goodell, stubborn as he is, finally has seen the light.

86 comments
DaveBaumgartner
DaveBaumgartner

Packer fans sure are a whiny one sided buncha fromage faced babies. syndromezed has it right, blown calls in final seconds are more dramatic, not more important, not a "bigger" screw up by refs. media and league darling that theyve been for 5 or more years now gb has gotten plenty of questionable, and beneficial to them, calls. the systematic, numerous and many being almost equally bad calls that went nearly all gb's way week 2 didnt have one eye catching last second call, but they were no less, moreso Id say, influential in who won.  yeah yeah dismiss me cuz Imma bears fan but my statements true. Nutup packer fans, so far youre not even close to the team most (including me) thought youd be, if you were, youd have taken care of biz long before the final minute. the phantom interference, borderline roughing, absurd pass interference or whatever calls on 3rd downs you dont convert are becoming a regular theme. Live by the sword........go grab a hunka gouda and have a good cry, let it all out.

 

JeremyAnderson
JeremyAnderson

Why is nobody talking about how Richard Sherman was called for a totally bogus pass interference call on 3rd and long on the ONLY touchdown scoring drive the packers made that night. Without getting totally bailed out on that play the score would have been 7 - 6 Hawks. So yes, the packers got screwed on the last play of the game, but it wasn't the only game-changing screw up of the game, just the easiest to rail against because it was the last play of the game.

 

Oh yes, Anyone who believes the drivel above about "They had not, aside from some randomly incorrect calls here and there, directly impacted a game’s outcome." should probably go talk to the Lions, I am sure there are a couple of million fans that would vehemently dispute that fact with you 

timeutin1
timeutin1

It comes down to respecting the fans that make the big salaries and profits possible. End the strike. Do the right thing for us, the fans. Join us  www.facebook.com/nflfanuprising.

kent.goble
kent.goble

It comes down to the whole game not this last play.  with reasonable officiating this game should have been seatlle 21 Green bay 6 and this play wouldnt have happened,  Seatle would have been killing the clock.

So the corect team won, get over it

ParishToni1
ParishToni1

Why try to convince a few delusional Seahawks fans what the rest of the world witnessed, saw, and know, that it was clearly and interception. They will say the sky is purple, when it is blue. That the sun rises in the South, when it rises in the east, if it affords their team a win.  The refs gave them and extra time out and it didn't work in game 1, so they gave them a touchdown and it gave them a win in week 3.  Possession of the ball and  a completed catch are two different things in the NFL. You can gain possession of a ball with out catching it.  Seahawks fans keep saying that there was no possession until their feet came down.  That is completely wrong.  When there is a fumble, and a player falls on the ball, he is in possession of the ball, but he never caught it. That is why when a receiver jumps up and "possesses" the ball but falls and lands on the ground, ball pops out, the ref. will always state that it was not a completed catch because the receiver did not maintain "possession of the ball" all the way through.  You CAN possess the ball in the air, but it is not a completed catch until you land on the ground and control it all the way through.  Those saying that Tate possessed the ball when their feet touched the ground are wrong.  Steve Mariucci made a great analysis of the call when they replayed it. First Tate grabs the wrist of Jenkins with his  right hand. Tate then releases his right hand, reaches again, and tries to grab the ball. Jenkins, this whole time never let go of the ball and had two hand firmly on it against his chest. The second Tate release his hand, in the air, it was clear that Jenkins had the ball.  As for all the talk that the Packers should worry about getting sacked 8 times and being manhandled in the first half, well football is a 60minute game. Greenbay played much better than Seattle in the second half.  As far as well there was a bad pi called on Seattle so the calls were even, Greenbay had a really bad pi called on them late in the game as well. The big difference is that the blown call in the end zone directly gave Seattle a touchdown. Where as with a PI, you still have a chance to hold them to a field goal

dscottref
dscottref

Dref

This situation should not be blamed on the "replacements", but on the "replay" ref in the booth, who is the regularly

employed official at this venue.

syndromezed
syndromezed

How many fans and players would prefer to have the season suspended, as though the players were the ones fighting with the owners?  F--- it, just join the NHL and cancel the season.

 

Personally, I'd rather have the replacement guys keep practicing.  I have no sympathy for the "real" refs.  Ed Hochuli has blown calls that "changed the outcome of the game" just like last night's - Google San Diego-Denver and his name, and you can even watch video of him reffing no better than the replacement guys.  The players may be complaining right now about this call, but during the game they've all learned to take full advantage of the situation and you don't hear them complaining about getting away with more while they're doing it.

Ken7
Ken7

This was Monday Night Raw!

syndromezed
syndromezed

Love the whole "let's ignore the other blown calls that kept Green Bay in the game at all" aspect for this story.  This is the only place I've seen someone claim he knows the defender came down with control first and Tate reached around afterward.  Every other story, and video from the game, make it look a lot closer to simultaneous possession.

Not to mention, Rodgers was sacked like 7 or 8 times, or something like that, in the first half alone, so how many  more would there have been if holding had been called on what passed for his offensive line? 

 

The idea that one blown call (even assuming it was a blown call) changed the outcome of the game is wrong - it's a psychological thing that comes from how our memories work, where recent events are given precedence over past ones until we've had time to process them.  We don't have time to process plays in football during the game, so the more recent plays - good or bad - are the ones that seem to matter most.  The catch is that they don't matter any more than any play that came before them in determining the outcome of the game.

Gavin
Gavin

The final play wouldn't have even been possible without a laughably horrible pass-interference call, also on a throw to Golden Tate.

The only appropriate offer to the referee's union at this point is 10% over whatever the refs' starting point for negotiations was.  Goodell and the owners lost, big-time. Refs are simply not commodities, they are an integral part of the product on the field.

Pay them. Now. Not tomorrow, not next week - NOW.

0xfece5
0xfece5

Time to put up or shut up and turn off the NFL until the real refs come back.  I'm done watching this garbage.  We can talk on Twitter all we want, but nothing will change until fans stop watching and stop going to games.

Bob16
Bob16

If you look closely on that third down "egregious pass interference call", the Green Bay defender has a good handful of the receiver's shirt in his left hand - the one on the side of the referee making the call and thus potentially impeding the full height of the receiver's jump at the ball. More than anything about regular vs. replacement refs, I think we are learning about just how fine a line there is regarding the rules of the game.

Max2
Max2

Is it just me or do all of the close games seem to be going for the home team.  Sounds like these replacement refs are afraid to make the correct call so they can get out of the stadium alive.  Imagine if they made that call last night and the game was in Green Bay?  They would need armed guards to take them out of that stadium.

Pares Hilton
Pares Hilton

Were the refs to blame for the Packers' scoreless first half? I wanted the Packers to win but that lousy offense doesn't deserve a win. Green Bay better move on from this and fix the offense.

Rob24
Rob24

The fans can make a difference and continue watching the lame product on the field.  Stop buying the products advertised.  Stop buying Budweiser and Miller.  Stop going to Bufalo Wildwings.

KennethKozak
KennethKozak

In regards to the football game last night...This is the right time for the NFL league office to take responsibility. Under the "Gross Unfairness Clause" of the nfl rulebook, the league commissioner holds the right to reverse the final outcome of a game. Anyone, who watches the tape of the play, can clearly see two different points as to why the play should not have stood. 1) blatant pass interference by Golden Tate prior to the ball even being touched; 2) The possession clause of similtanious catch rule. Either one of these would have clearly given the victory to the Green Bay Packers. However, this is where the NFL league office is facing the real issue; To change the outcome of the game as it was ruled on the field would be in essence, admitting that the replacement referees were wrong. The league office has a vested interest in not allowing anything that could directly effect their bargaining position with the Umpires Union, come into play. They have a monetary interest in NOT changing the onfield ruling. It will take character and integrity for Commissioner God-ell to take a stand for the SAKE OF THE INTEGRITY of the game. The league office phone number is; 212-450-2027.

greg18
greg18

I read a story earlier that the locked out refs are somehow in control over the major Division 1 college refs so if they accepted a position as a temporary ref, they could lose their jobs as Division 1 refs.  ( I hope that makes sense).  I will have to see if I can find the story.

 

These guys are doing the best they can, in the position they were put in.

Marcus2
Marcus2

The NFL is giving us all the big middle finger for what amounts to some pocket change.  They either do not understand - or do not care - what the NFL means to us. All that matters is how they can squeeze out every last penny. They are mining all of the value that has been built up in the "NFL Shield" over many generations, converting it into cold hard cash and, frankly, not giving a d*** about what gets left behind on the field.

J12
J12

They didn't just blow the final call. There were a number of key calls that helped and hurt both teams. Lots of non-calls against GB O-line holding in second half etc. Poor officiating but let's not make it like the final play was the critical one...there were many...it was just the most glaring one. NFL, smarten up.

Brad G
Brad G

Boycott the NFL until they pay the Zebras.  It is insulting that they think we'll settle for the crap they are giving us to watch.  The NFL owes me 3 hours of my life back!

DaveBaumgartner
DaveBaumgartner

packer backers are possibly the most passionate and rabid fans in NFL, also the silliest, dumbest, most nonsensical, delusional homers in all sports, go to lambeau, they sound like a buncha soccer moms who have limited to no knowledge of the actual game, but squawk like vultures when any calls go against their lil baby

RynoM3tal
RynoM3tal

 @ParishToni1 YOU are a poor excuse of a cheesehead....IT"S JENNINGS NOT JENKINS YOU IDIOT....Get your facts straight before you try to make sense.....MORON!!

Richard25
Richard25

 @AaronMasser Are you blind, what about the pass interference,did you not see that either

Max2
Max2

You are out of your mind, there is not one analyst or reporter that believes that there was simultaneous possession on the last play of the game.  The fact that you bring up that the Packers doesn't deserve the win because Rodgers got sacked or their offensive line played poorly is dumb.  Why does Seattle deserve the win, their offense was horrible the whole game, Green Bay outplayed them in the second half and to have the win taken away by high school refs is a joke

JeanneNoir
JeanneNoir

 @Pares Hilton so your argument here is: if a NFL team sucks the first half, they dont deserve to get fair calls by the referees...?  wow. 

Max2
Max2

That's like saying "do the Seahawks deserve a win since they realistically scored only 7 points", their offenses was even worse than the Packers in the second half.  Dumb argument.

syndromezed
syndromezed

 @KennethKozak Actually, reversing the outcome would destroy the integrity of the game. Period. 

 

1) Blatant or not, a single missed call can never be the deciding factor of a game's outcome. That ignores every other play, every made and missed call, that happened before it.  The real refs have blown calls that made a difference in the score of the game, too, but they don't get reversed. 

 

2) That the play was close enough to invoke simultaneous possession rules suggests it's not clearly obvious that it wasn't simultaneous possession.  And in the end zone, the receiver is awarded the TD as soon as he establishes any possession, even simultaneous possession.  So they may or may not have blown the possession part of the call, but it's hardly so cut and dried that it would fall under the Gross Unfairness clause.

 

I said it before and I'll say it again - one play NEVER decides the outcome of the game, it's the sum total of all the plays of the game.  A blown call earlier in the game that gave Green Bay a first down and let them get into field goal range - which did happen, by the way, in the 3rd quarter - is equally as important for the final outcome.

 

The only time a game outcome should be reversed should be after evidence turns up that the players (or coaches or refs) are throwing the game, for money or whatever reasons.  Changing the outcome because of human error would do far more to destroy the integrity of the sport than a few mistakes by the refs that may or may not have changed the final outcome.

BobKranz
BobKranz

 @KennethKozak To change the ruling on the last play would mean that you completely ignore the bad calls against the Seahawks defense that kept the Packers drive alive on their TD drive. How do you rectify that? They should have been kicking a field goal them selves in which case the hawks would only have needed a field goal to win anyway...

imikem2
imikem2

 @KennethKozak Puh-leeze. This is hardly the first game ever to be decided by a crappy officiating call. Vikings-Packers 2010, was decided by a flubbed call of what otherwise would have been a last moment touchdown pass to Visanthe Shiancoe. The league admitted the call was wrong. Maybe that game should have been reversed too, which would have meant the Packers didn't even qualify for the playoffs, and hence couldn't win the SB that year. 

 

Packers got screwed. Cry me a river. Join the rest of us who've been robbed over the years.

Bob16
Bob16

 @KennethKozak 1) as ESPN commentators remarked, pass interference is seldom if ever called in those situations 2) if the GB player had such obvious possession so that it was not simultaneous, then why didn't he just rip the ball from the Seahawk's control?

Pares Hilton
Pares Hilton

Outcome will not be reversed for the simple reason that money had already changed hands in Las Vegas, same reason the Patriots' Spygate Championships will never be vacated.

BobKranz
BobKranz

 @greg18 I think that the actual problem is the union for the div 1 refs will not allow their members to work the NFL games. Unions supporting unions as they should.  If lockouts were overcome by owners this way then we may as well go back to the old days where you got worked to death for little pay and fired for absolutely no reason other than they wanted to replace you with someone at half your salary.

greg18
greg18

 @Marcus2

 "pocket change"?  How much money is this pocket change of which you speak?  How much does it amount to over time?

greg18
greg18

 @Brad G

 The NFL owes you nothing.  It is your choice whether to watch or not.  People will go to the games and people will watch.  There will be no significant boycott. 

 

Defined benefit plans are a dinosaur in this day and age.  If you don't know what that is, you might want to look it up.

syndromezed
syndromezed

 @Max2I never said either team "deserved" anything.  That whole idea of "so and so deserved this" is a BS statement.  An offense can be outplayed all game long by the opponent, and still win because of special teams or a better defense.  You don't get points just for playing better than the other team - football's designed to allow one brilliant play to wipe out 55 minutes of better play by the other team, unless that better play is "better enough" to put so many points on the board the other team can't keep up.

 

But you missed my point entirely anyway, which was that one play, even if it's the last one, does not make or break a game.  GB had its share of blown calls go its way, one of which led directly to them getting a FG instead of punting and keeping Seattle from getting the ball back for another minute or two.  Our minds make the last play stand out more, so it seems more important, but that play in the 3rd quarter might have been more important than the final play, since a 2 point GB lead at the end of the game wouldn't have required a pass to the endzone to beat.

syndromezed
syndromezed

 @Max2 No, it's like saying "Do the Packers deserve a win because they got away with enough of their own BS to score more than the Seahawks for part of the game"?

Marcus2
Marcus2

 @greg18 In comparison to total revenues? In comparison to profits? In comparison to the damaged value of the brand? And more directly, in comparison with the cost of making it crystal clear to the whole world that, if anything, the refs were undervalued? Yea, pal...pocket change. 

DoorCty
DoorCty

 @greg18  @Brad G Defined benefits are a dinosaur because corporations that are giving execs ridiculous bonuses while pleading that they have no money pull them from the people who earned them.

Thundrra
Thundrra

 @greg18  @Brad G Greg. You sound like you hate defined benefits more than you love football.  If your not a football fan, why are you on here?

 

Brad G
Brad G

No, there won't be a significant boycott, because folks like greg18 will settle for an inferior product.  Some of us know when we are being duped.  If you don't know what it means to be duped, you might want to look it up.

Mark S1
Mark S1

 @syndromezed  @Max2 One play,one final call decided who won that game - how does that not "make or break" this particular game? Now as for that "one which led directly" call -  I am assuming you refer to the PI on Chancellor? It was the 4th quarter, not 3rd, and on the 44 yard line. It was 3rd and 2. Green Bay was dominating on defense. The Packers very well may have gone for that on 4th down. That play did not necessarily "extend" that drive because that is a spot in the field and a time in the game where McCarthy has gone for it in the past, especially when his defense is playing well and he feels they are controlling the game. We'll never know, but the PI was not an absolute game changer. You make your statement as if you presume to know exactly what would have happened next. You presume to know for sure GB would have punted and not tried for a first down which they may have gotten to extend that drive anyways. Why don't we talk about how even after that PI, the ball was still only at the 39 and the Seattle defense had a chance to make a defensive stop, which they did not. That PI did not lead directly to points. Seattle had a chance to overcome that bad call, which they did not. Green Bay was not afforded a chance to overcome that final, blown call and it DID lead directly to points. Weak argument. 

syndromezed
syndromezed

 @Max2 As it said in my other posts, BS = the blown calls that went in GB's favor earlier in the game.  Hilton's argument is legit - GB needs to fix their problems on offense no matter what refs are working the game.  Frankly, neither team seemed significantly better than the other, even though on paper GB should be heads and tails above Seattle.  But Rodgers needs a line or "on paper" will be read as "but that was last year's offense".

syndromezed
syndromezed

 @Brad G   How is being a lawyer who gets an extra $180,000 (plus retirement benefits) for working about 20 or 30 extra hours "working class"?  Captain Biceps is a lawyer in his regular job.  As an NFL ref, he gets $8,000 for each game he works.  Even if he shows up an hour early and leaves an hour late, that's a nifty $1,600.00 *per hour* in salary alone.  Even the President only gets about $110.00 per hour.  Not eleven hundred, one hundred ten.

 

Name any working or middle class person that makes a salary of sixteen hundred dollars per hour.  Google it, even - find one anywhere.  If anyone's got Romney's deluded sense of reality, it's you, bud.

 

Their absence might suck, and like I said, they have every right to try and keep the NFL from breaking their union, which is really what this is all about.  But these guys are no more working class than Tom Brady or Jerry Jones.

Brad G
Brad G

 @syndromezed  @greg18 Given the lack of quality in the replacements, I'd say they are worth every penny, plus whatever else they want.  Even Scott Walker the Union-hating thug Governor of Wisconsin wants to see these unionized officials get paid.  

Brad G
Brad G

 @syndromezed  @greg18 Mitt Romney is that you?  Say hello to your money in the Cayman Islands.  In the NFL, the Zebras are working class, and in their absence the NFL sucks!

syndromezed
syndromezed

 @Brad G  @greg18 Oh that's a shoebox full of crap if ever there was one.  Those "working men" have regular jobs, and this is their bloody hobby.  They work part time for barely half a year and get almost 200 grand to do it.  On top of that, they get a pension on par with those that bankrupted several California cities and is pushing San Diego to the financial brink.

 

All that to work 4 hours, one day a week, for 18-20 weeks.  How many "working men" get that kind of compensation?

 

The NFL is increasing their per-game wage in their offer, but converting their pension to 401K type benefits like most of the rest of us get.  Same thing the cities in California are doing.  We're hardly talking about indentured servitude or pittance wages here.  The refs may not be billionaires, but they're hardly scraping by either.  It's their right to fight with the NFL to get whatever they can, but I'm not going to lay this all at the owners' feet and I'm certainly not going to entertain the laugh-o-rama idea that this is some "working shlub vs. billionaire" fight going on.

Brad G
Brad G

 @greg18 Whether it is wages or benefits is irrelevant.  The refs make nothing compared to the players and owners, so just give them what they want and restore the integrity of the game.  Until they do, I'm done watching.

greg18
greg18

 @Brad G

 Again, I don't think it's the wage they are arguing over.  It is the long term benefits. It's why I tried to explain (obviously very poorly) about defined benefit plans.

Brad G
Brad G

 @greg18 No, I doubt it is, but the current situation with the replacement refs is ruining the integrity of the game.  All because billionaires don't want to pay working men a decent wage.  Those same billionaires don't have the brains to realize they are destroying their own product out of greed.  As a fan of the game, I think we owe it to game to demand a better product.

greg18
greg18

 @Brad G

 So this was the first time in NFL history that the wrong call has been made at the end of a game and the wrong team was given the victory?